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Locations - Port Meadow

 

"We used to play cricket under difficulties on Port Meadow (this must have been in the following year). The sole advantage of Port Meadow as a cricket pitch was the absence of boundaries. If an ambitious and powerful slogger wanted to hit a ball as far as Wolvercote, he could do so if he liked; there was nothing to stop him, and the runs would be faithfully run out. The chief drawback was that the city burgesses used the meadow for pasturage of their cows - graminivorous animals of casual habits. When fielding was "deep'', and frenzied cries of "Throw her up!'' reached one from the wicket, it was usually more discreet to feign a twisted ankle or a sudden faintness, and allow some keener enthusiast to recover the ball from where it lay."

[left] Port Meadow is a 342 acre grassland which was given to Oxford by William the Conqueror. 200 Oxford freemen and the commoners of Bisney and Wolvercote have the grazing rights on it. It has never been ploughed or built on.

It is viewed here from the Wolvercote end, looking back towards Oxford. The area immediately beyond the bunker was used as a cricket pitch until around 15 years ago.

 

 


Copyright. All copyright on the photos on this page belongs to the Kenneth Grahame Society.

For fuller details on the use of any of the images contact the society. (photography@kennethgrahamesociety.net)